North Dakota House passes two pro-life bills, advance to Senate
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North Dakota House passes two pro-life bills, advance to Senate

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The North Dakota House passed two pro-life bills this week that will now head to the Senate for a vote. One bill requires physicians to inform women who take the abortion pill that it can be reversed. The second bill bans dismemberment (D&E) abortions.

State representatives passed House Bill 1336 in an overwhelming vote of 73-16 on January 28. It would require abortionists to inform women that it is possible to reverse the effects of the abortion pill if they take the first of the two-dose pill and then change their minds. The bill will now move to the Senate for a vote.

“This bill provides women with a fully informed choice,” said Rep. Kathy Skroch, R-Lidgerwood. “And for many women, a second choice, a second chance.”

Over 500 babies have been saved so far using abortion pill reversal. The success rate has been reported as 68 percent if a doctor can begin administering progesterone within 72 hours of the woman taking the first abortion pill. Women who regret taking the abortion pill can contact the Abortion Pill Rescue 24-7 helpline at 1-877-558-0333 to find a doctor near them.

READ: These babies were saved by abortion pill reversal. So were hundreds of others.

On Thursday, the House also passed House Bill 1546, which bans dismemberment abortions. The bill passed easily in a vote of 78-13. In dismemberment, or D&E, abortions, the abortionist uses a Sopher clamp to literally rip the preborn child’s arms and legs from his body before crushing his skull. It is a “blind” procedure, which means the abortionist could easily perforate the woman’s uterus. Former abortionist Dr. Anthony Levatino describes the procedure in the video below:

 

 

Any doctor who commits a dismemberment abortion in North Dakota in a non-emergency situation would be charged with a felony punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. According to Dr. Levatino, there is no medical reason or emergency which would require a dismemberment abortion, or any abortion, to occur:

 

 

The bill will now move to the Senate. If it passes there, it is not clear if Republican Gov. Doug Burgum would sign it. In addition, a similar D&E law in Arkansas is currently being heard in the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. That court also includes North Dakota; therefore, if the judge rules it to be unconstitutional in Arkansas, it is likely to be ruled the same for North Dakota. Until the state’s attorney general recommends that it is “reasonably probable” for the dismemberment abortion law to be “upheld as constitutional,” it would not take effect.

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