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Pro-abortion actress Amy Brenneman claims pro-lifers “stole” Christianity but can’t explain how

Another day, another utterly insipid pro-abortion diatribe is being promoted as wise and courageous by the cult of death—this time with a heaping helping of sacrelige.

Actress Amy Brenneman, who we’ve refuted before at Live Action for similar screeds, has a new video out as part of the “Lives of Women” project, which supposedly “showcases the voices, thoughts, and experiences of women as shaped by their past choices, present, and hopes for the future.” However, throughout its one-minute, thirteen-second run time, it’s hard to find so much as a single word that rises to the level of thought.

Brenneman states, “I absolutely think the word Christian has been stolen in 2017 in America by the Christian Right.”

Right, where would anybody get the crazy notion that Christianity opposes abortion? Just because its Bible teaches that all human life is made in God’s image and it’s evil to shed innocent blood? Those of us who say not to kill babies have totally “stolen” the faith, not those trying to graft abortion into it. Sure, Amy. She continues:

I had an abortion when I was 21. I had actually been public about having had an abortion ten years ago, but that was pre-social media. So now in the age of Twitter and Facebook, I was trolled pretty viciously. The experience of withstanding that has been really transformative.

Clearly, Brenneman is the victim here.

First, “vicious trolling” on social media is pretty much any day ending in Y for pro-lifers, so join the club. Second, if any of those trolls said you had a preborn son or daughter killed, they were simply stating an objectively-true fact. Third, you’re in Hollywood, perhaps the biggest echo chamber in the country, so let’s not pretend some mean words on the internet came close to canceling out the accolades from 99.99999999% of the people you interact with every day in real life. 

Brenneman went on:

In my church, we are prayerfully pro-choice, which means that we believe in the moral agency of women. I think a woman’s moral agency means that she has autonomy over herself to decide what is right for her body and decide what is right for her fetus. So I don’t feel like I’m in conflict with where I go every Sunday.

Where to begin with this gibberish? First, it’s worth noting that Brenneman has previously summarized her “Christianity” as follows:

“I’m pretty much the opposite of an orthodox anything,” she laughs. “Currently, I go to a wonderful Episcopalian church, but I’m also half-Jewish. I’m a real polyglot.

“I’ve always thought that with all the beautiful expressions there are in the world of how human beings can find meaning in life, for anyone to say that ‘our way is the only way’ just closes doors when we should be looking to open them.”

In other words, not only is her “Christian Church” a denomination with a notorious history of rejecting Christianity on controversial issues (which she may have sought out specifically because it reinforced her pre-existing biases), but Brenneman doesn’t consider any single religion absolutely true, totally binding, or necessarily more correct than any other—which defeats the entire purpose of religion in the first place, and completely negates the supposed weight of her “Christian perspective” on abortion.

Second, because her faith is so shallow and meaningless, note well that she commits the same offense these “religious defense of abortion” pieces always do: failing to cite so much as a single Bible verse that explicitly or implicitly justifies abortion, and not even bothering to explain why preborn babies are exempt from God’s love or God’s commandment against murder.

Instead, all we get is meaningless drivel about “moral agency of women” justifying absolute dominion over “what is right for her body” and “what is right for her fetus.” Somehow. Never mind that the preborn baby is not “her body,” or that everybody has “moral agency,” which no serious Christian theologian has ever interpreted to mean that everyone gets to completely make up his or her morality and substitute that for the rules God wrote in stone for all of us.

Tell us, Amy, what are the boundaries of “moral agency”? Why does it mean women get to decide if preborn babies should die, but nobody else gets to decide when anybody else should die? If “what is right for [your] fetus” can potentially be death, are there any other circumstances in which killing a born son or daughter might be a parent’s proper determination of “what is right for” them?

Something tells me Amy Brenneman couldn’t answer a single one of these questions. But don’t ask her—that would be “vicious.”

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