Can you be a pro-life feminist?
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Can you be a pro-life feminist?

pro-life feminist

March is Women’s History Month, a time to honor the achievements and accomplishments of notable women throughout history, as well as to promote equality between men and women. Unsurprisingly, it’s also a time for modern feminists — who are largely pro-abortion — to advocate for their goals.

Ivanka Trump, daughter of President Donald Trump, took to Twitter at the beginning of the month to celebrate Women’s History Month, with a seemingly benign, inoffensive tweet.

Trump has used her time in the spotlight since her father’s election to advocate for women, and mothers specifically, calling for more family-friendly policies like paid family leave. Still, she immediately got pushback from her tweet, largely due to her father’s history. While judging a woman for the actions of a man doesn’t seem very “feminist,” such is the state of the so-called feminist movement today.

This led to an op-ed in USA Today, questioning if it was possible for someone to be both a conservative, and a feminist. And for the modern feminist movement, the biggest sticking point is abortion. Intersectional feminism is a trendy new buzzword, but pro-life feminists? Not included or allowed.

READ: An actress, a singer, and a supermodel show that true feminists are pro-life

Feminism has essentially been subverted by the abortion industry. While there may be disagreements between conservatives and liberals on various policy issues, the disagreement on abortion is fundamental. In today’s world, as in the tweet above, feminism and abortion are inseparable. If the leaders of the modern feminist movement are asked if it’s possible for someone to be both pro-life and a feminist, the answer is almost always a resounding no.

Clearly, they aren’t all that familiar with what the early feminists believed.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Alice Paul, Maddie H. Brinckerhoff, Dr. Alice Bunker Stockham, Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell — all believed in protecting both women and their preborn babies from the evil of abortion. It is true that these early feminists wanted to end crisis pregnancies, but not through abortion. Rather, they wanted women to have better options, more support and resources, and a more family-friendly culture in general, so that women would not be driven to abortion through the actions of men or from fear that they couldn’t handle raising a baby.

Women who get pregnant while they are still students, for example, have perhaps a much steeper hill to climb than those who have already graduated from high school or college. Many colleges make it clear that pregnant women are not welcome. High school students similarly face an atmosphere that is less than friendly.

Then there are women who are coerced into abortion, threatened with homelessness or violence. They may be struggling with poverty or drug abuse, family turmoil, or a lack of resources. And abortion does absolutely nothing to address any of these problems, something that even abortionists have admitted.

All abortion does is kill a preborn baby, an innocent human being. It does not address any of these issues. Rather than helping women, the legalization of abortion allowed all of these problems to continue, because after all, why bother addressing the roots of what drives women in desperation to make such a choice? Abortion makes it all go away — for everyone except the mother and her baby, that is. It’s perhaps the least feminist lie to ever be sold to women, to present abortion packaged as something empowering and feminist.

Not only can pro-lifers be feminists, it’s more feminist than being pro-abortion. The abortion movement does not give any solutions for the problems that plague women, but instead, hands them only death, violence, and pain. What, exactly, is feminist about that?

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