Analysis

Kansas judge says no to allowing telemedicine abortion pills

abortion pill abortion pill reversal

An abortion facility will not be permitted to commit telemed abortions, thanks to the ruling of a Kansas judge.

The Trust Women Foundation — named after the legacy of notorious late-term abortionist George Tiller and formed after his murder — had requested an injunction allowing its Wichita abortion facility to commit telemed abortions, despite being against Kansas law. Shawnee County District Judge Teresa Watson denied the request, and Trust Women Foundation CEO Julie Burkhart said they now have no plans to continue with the procedures. “We cannot broaden that access and feel confident that the clinic or the physicians will not be penalized for that,” Burkhart said in a statement to the AP. “If we’re putting our physicians or the clinic in jeopardy, we’re working against our mission. The mission is to bring access to people.”

During a telemed abortion, a woman consults with an abortionist through a webcam, with no physical exam, and the abortion pills are then dispensed after their consultation. The abortion industry has been enthusiastically pushing telemed abortions as the future of the abortion industry.

Typically, a woman needs to undergo an examination before going through with an abortion, even one that is said to be “safe,” like abortion pills. Yet the abortion pill regimen is by no means harmless; at least 24 women have died, and thousands of others have experienced complications, some severe, including hemorrhaging so severely that they needed blood transfusions to survive. While telemedicine for simple illnesses can be beneficial for those in need of care, the abortion pill regimen is not the same.

As former abortionist Anthony Levatino explains, there are numerous risks and side effects to a medication abortion, such as abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, heavy bleeding, and headaches. Deaths from abortion pills are typically from infection and undiagnosed ectopic pregnancies.

READ: Four lies abortion supporters are telling about abortion pill reversal… and the truth


It’s because of these risks that an abortion without proper medical oversight should not be allowed. Not only do women taking abortion pills by telemedicine not have a proper in-person examination with the abortionist, there is a lack of follow-up care after she has taken the pills, making the risks of a medication abortion even worse.

According to KSHB.com, 18 other states besides Kansas “have laws requiring doctors to be physically present when abortion medications are dispensed.” In her ruling, Judge Watson said claims of harms to patients if telemedicine abortions aren’t approved is “speculative.” Currently, the facility has two abortionists, who both live out of the state and come to town twice per week. This shortage of abortionists is the reason behind the abortion industry’s push for telemedicine abortion. KSHB notes, “[D]uring a hearing in May, Burkhart testified that webcam conferences made the doctors available an extra eight to 12 hours a week and sometimes cut patient wait times to less than two hours from six to eight hours. Trust Women also hopes eventually to open a clinic in rural Kansas offering telemedicine abortions.”

Even Planned Parenthood admits that “The abortion pill can cost up to around $1000, but is often less.” That means that even though abortion facilities aren’t doing surgeries with a medication abortion, they’re still getting hundreds of dollars for them. Unfortunately, the abortion industry seems more concerned about lowering their own costs and raising profits than they are with the safety of women, which is why Judge Watson’s ruling was exactly the right one to make.

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