'Gosnell' shakes attorney's views: 'At some point, it's not abortion, it's murder'
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‘Gosnell’ shakes attorney’s views: ‘At some point, it’s not abortion, it’s murder’

Gosnell

Writing for The Federalist, Missouri attorney Adam Mill says he spent years avoiding the issue of abortion. Mill writes that before watching “Gosnell: The Trial of America’s Biggest Serial Killer” he “lacked the moral courage to really think about it and form my own opinion.”

The film, which is a dramatization of the real-life trial of abortionist Kermit Gosnell for the murder of infants born alive in botched abortions, confronts the audience with the gruesome reality of abortion and the moral questions involved. The film does this without gore. Mill explains:

“Gosnell” is not about an abortion doctor committing “murder” by aborting fetuses –– the movie is about a doctor killing delivered babies who breathe, move, and sometimes even cry before abortionist Kermit Gosnell used a pair of scissors to “snip” their spinal cord. Be outraged and shocked by that. But hold your outrage long enough to confront how Gosnell defends his actions, because that’s the real crux of the issue.

Gosnell defended his inhumane murder of countless infants using the arguments that abortion supporters use to defend killing preborn babies still in the womb. Mill writes, “At the end of Gosnell’s procedure, he considers it a success if the woman is no longer pregnant and there is no baby. Is it really murder outside the womb, but legal when a doctor completes the procedure inside?”

Mill points to the inadequacy of the abortion debate in the United States. The Supreme Court legalized abortion with the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973, which means that individual Americans do not take part in a democratic process to determine the legality of abortion.

READ: How the abortion industry allows abortionists like Gosnell to flourish

In this political environment, many people are, like Mill, “agnostic” on abortion and unwilling to confront the reality and form an opinion. “Gosnell” prompted Mill to reconsider his apathy and, for the first time, really confront the question of “when the termination of a pregnancy crosses the line from helping a woman with an unwanted pregnancy into murder.”

The reason confronting this question is necessary, Mill concludes, is that “Gosnell proved one thing beyond refutation: at some point it’s not abortion, it’s murder.”

Mill is not alone; media entrepreneur Patrick Courrielche and political commentator Kathy Zhu have both said that watching Gosnell made them pro-life.

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