Beautiful family photos feature baby who had prenatal spina bifida surgery
Human Interest

Beautiful family photos feature baby who had prenatal spina bifida surgery

spina bifida

Parker Trinkle was diagnosed with myelomeningocele, a form of spina bifida, in the womb. His parents opted for fetal surgery. EBU Photography was there with Parker’s family to capture them in beautiful newborn photographs that shared a little bit about their journey. The photographer posted:

I was lucky enough to take photos of sweet baby Parker and his family today! Parker has myelomeningocele the most common and severe form of spina bifida, a defect of the spine in which part of the spinal cord and its meninges are exposed through a gap in the backbone. Open fetal surgery is a delicate surgical procedure where fetal surgeons open the uterus and close the opening in the baby’s back while they are still in the womb. Because spinal cord damage is progressive during gestation, prenatal repair of myelomeningocele may prevent further damage.

It is is an extremely complex procedure available only to qualified candidates, fetal surgery for myelomeningocele requires significant commitment on the part of mothers who choose to go forward with it and extensive surgical experience to perform successfully. Parker and Jessica underwent Open Fetal surgery in Orlando, Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies being the 4th patients ever to have the surgery in the state. Surgery took place at 25 weeks gestation and Parker made his arrival at 37 weeks gestation, 2/6/19 being the first ever baby with Spina Bifida in 70 years to be born at Winnie Palmer and not have to be admitted into the neonatal intensive care unit.

READ: Abortion doesn’t help babies with spina bifida, but prenatal surgery does

Read more about Parker and his family’s journey on their Facebook page, Positively Parker.

Parker’s mother posted on his Facebook page that even with no physical therapy yet, they’re already seeing movement below the waist. Amazing!!

Many children who have fetal surgery for spina bifida have improved success rates over children who have it after birth. Regardless, persons with spina bifida — with or without surgery — can go on to lead productive and full lives. They deserve a chance at life — not to be aborted because they have a condition that others may arbitrarily feel would limit their lives in some way.

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